Highlights: Alicia Keys, ‘Here’


Alicia Keys, HERE © RCA

★★★

Alicia Keys aims for big, socially conscious ideas on her sixth studio album ‘Here.’ Those ideas aren’t always executed seamlessly, however.

Alicia Keys tends to take her time when it comes to releasing new albums.  Here, her sixth album, arrives four years after her last (Girl on Fire).  Here is different from previous Keys albums.  Throughout its course, she aims at bigger ideas, specifically socially.  Sometimes it works well, while other times, Keys feels like she falls just short or the song hasn’t been fully developed.  

“The Gospel”

“The Gospel” is a thoughtful number blending facets of R&B, hip-hop, and singer/songwriter.  Produced by Keys, hubby Swizz Beatz, and Mark Batson, the results are superb.  Like the socially conscious intro preceding it, Keys aims for the same direction, painting a picture of families from the ghetto:

“So we all got children, products of the ghetto / Momma cooked the soup, daddy di the yelling / Uncle was a drunk, cousin was a felon / When he got pitched, he told them he wasn’t tellin’.”

“She Don’t Really Care_1 Luv”

“She Don’t Really Care_1 Luv” returns to the more familiar urban contemporary sound associated with Keys.  Once more produced by Swizz Beatz, another hard beat anchors.  “She Don’t Really Care” features one of the catchiest refrains of the entire album, filled with grit and attitude.

“She grew up in Brooklyn / she grew up in Harlem / She grew up in Bronx / She know she was a queen / she lived in Queens / oh yeah, oh yeah / but she don’t really care / she throw them diamonds in the air…”

“…1 Luv” contrasts the first part, with a slightly more enigmatic sound.  Still, it’s firmly planted in urban roots, featuring clear vocals from Keys.

“Blended Family (What You Do for Love)”

Highlight Blended Family (What You Do for Love),” featuring A$AP Rocky, is well produced, seamlessly blending pop and R&B. The guitars and light touches of piano are successful.  The beat is dusty and soulful in an old-school hip-hop idiom. Songwriting is where the song’s bread is buttered as Keys gets personal about her own family.

“I know it started with a little drama / I hate you had to read it in the paper/ but everything’s alright with me and ya Mama / baby everybody here you know adores ya.”

She unifies on the hook: 

“That’s what you do, what you do, what you do / what you do for love / ‘cause there’s ain’t nothing, there ain’t nothing / their ain’t nothing I won’t do for us / It may not be easy / this blend family, but baby / that’s what you do, what you do, what you do / what you do for love.”

“More Than We Know”

“More Than We Know” is firmly planted in Keys’ wheelhouse.  It doesn’t supplant the biggest hits of her career by any means, but offers a glimpse back. Something about this record reminisces back to Lauryn Hill (The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill). R&B infused pop closer Holy Warextends upon the sentiment, delivering one of Keys’ most socially relevant singles of her career.  It should be noted that this ISN’T the best song of her career… or the album.

Final Thoughts 

All in all, much of Here comes from a good place for Alicia Keys.  On paper, she aims to deliver big, socially relevant messages.  The problem is, Here doesn’t completely gel, even with ambitious intent.  In that regard, this project lacks the polish and memorability of her previous work.  It’s not bad in the least, but imperfect.

Gems: “The Gospel,” “She Don’t Really Care_1 Luv,” “Blended Family (What You Do for Love),” “More Than We Know” & “Holy War”  

Alicia Keys • HERE • RCA • Release: 11.4.16 
Photo Credit: RCA 

A full track-by-track review of the album can be found at The Musical Hype.

 

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